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Redistribution proposal: NSW

Proposed boundaries for New South Wales include the abolition of the electorate of North Sydney. Under the proposal, voters from this electorate would be transferred to the surrounding electorates of Bennelong, Bradfield, and Warringah.

The proposal would also expand the basis for naming the electorate of Cook, co-naming the division for both former prime minister Joseph Cook and Captain James Cook.

The proposal includes changes to 39 of New South Wales’ current 47 electorates in order to ensure that each electorate contains a similar number of voters.

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Redistribution proposal: WA

Proposed boundaries for Western Australia include creation of a new electoral division centred on the Perth Hills region.

The new division is proposed to be named Bullwinkel in honour of Lieutenant Colonel Vivian Bullwinkel – an Australian nurse in World War II. The proposal recognises Vivian Bullwinkel’s dedication to honouring victims of war crimes, and her service to nursing, and the community, in both her civilian and military life.

All WA divisions will change with significant changes proposed for Hasluck, Swan, Durack, Canning, Burt and O’Connor. Overall, the proposal includes 14.57% of all WA electors moving divisions.

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Redistribution proposal: VIC

Proposed boundaries for Victoria include the abolition of the electoral division of Higgins – a seat to the east of Melbourne. This proposal considered public suggestions and recognises that population growth is lower in the east of Melbourne and higher in the west.

Under the proposal, electors in Higgins will be transferred to the surrounding divisions of Chisholm, Hotham, Kooyong, Macnamara and Melbourne.

The proposal includes a total of 8.31% of all Victorian electors moving divisions.

Ballot-papers

Preferential voting

The preferential voting system used for the House of Representatives means that multiple counts of ballot papers occur to determine who has acquired an absolute majority of the total votes (more than 50% of formal votes). It is a similar process for the Senate however, each Senate contest will elect multiple representatives where multiple counts of ballot papers occur to determine which candidates have achieved the required quota of formal votes to be elected.

During the counting process, votes are transferred between candidates or parties according to the preferences marked by voters. In the House for example, if your first preference of candidate isn’t elected, your vote moves to your next preference and so on.

See more.

The eReturns application may be unavailable due to planned maintenance on Tuesday 23rd July 2024 from 8.00am to 5.00pm AEST.

State and Territory events 2024

2024 Northern Territory Legislative Assembly (Territory) Election

The 2024 Northern Territory Legislative Assembly (Territory) Election, to be held on Saturday, 24 August 2024, is run by the Northern Territory Electoral Commission. Information about this election is available at Northern Territory Electoral Commission.

2024 New South Wales Local Government Elections

The 2024 New South Wales Local Government Elections, to be held on Saturday, 14 September 2024, are run by New South Wales Electoral Commission. Information about these elections is available at New South Wales Electoral Commission.

2024 Victorian Local Government Elections

The 2024 Victorian Local Government Elections, to be held in October 2024, are run by the Victorian Electoral Commission. Information about these elections is available from the Victorian Electoral Commission.

Disinformation register

DISINFORMATION
Ongoing

Election timing

The AEC doesn't get advanced notice of election timing.

DISINFORMATION
Ongoing

Pens/Pencils

No one is rubbing out your vote.

DISINFORMATION
Ongoing

Preferential voting

If your first preference doesn't get enough votes, your vote is not wasted.

DISINFORMATION
Ongoing

Election advertising

Claims that pre-election media and advertising by political parties is illegal are false.

YouTube
Nov 2021

When's the election

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Aug 2021

The count: Declaring results

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Apr 2023

Referendum Disclosure

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Jun 2022

2022 federal election in review

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Mar 2022

Reporting misinformation

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Mar 2022

Go ahead, ask us anything

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Aug 2021

Electoral integrity

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Apr 2022

Online voting

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Sep 2022

What is a referendum?

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Sep 2023

Naming electoral divisions

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Answers to common questions

When will the next federal election be held?

Federal elections must be held at least once in every three years on a date determined by the Governor General, upon request by the government.

I am living or going overseas

To be eligible to enrol to vote from overseas, you must be an Australian citizen aged 18 years or older, and intend to return to Australia within six years.

How do I return my form to the AEC?

You can upload, fax, or post your signed form or letter to the AEC.

A relative has died. How do I remove their name from the roll?

You do not need to notify the AEC when a relative or friend has died as this information is provided to the AEC.

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