Australian Electoral Commission

Enrolment – Frequently Asked Questions

Updated: 20 December 2013

What is 'close of rolls'?

The 'close of rolls' is the date the electoral roll closes for the federal election. When the writs are issued for the federal election, a date is set for the close of rolls. After this date, you cannot enrol or update your details on the electoral roll for the federal election.

The close of rolls date is 8pm local Australian time on the seventh calendar day after the writs are issued for the federal election.

You must be enrolled at your current address so you can vote for the candidates in your electorate (also known as electoral division) in the federal election.

Can I be enrolled if I haven't completed an enrolment form?

Yes. New laws passed by the Australian Parliament allow us to directly enrol or update your address on the electoral roll based on information from other government agencies.

This does not happen automatically. The AEC has comprehensive checks in place to confirm if you are eligible to enrol and that you live at a particular address.

More details about this process are available here:

This process will not affect everyone and it is still your responsibility to enrol to vote and keep your enrolment details up-to-date.

What if I live at more than one address?

You should enrol for the address which is your permanent residential address. This is the address you intend to return to even if you are living somewhere else temporarily.

For example, while studying at university you can remain on the electoral roll for your home address.

Remember you must vote for the electorate you are enrolled in.

Will I be fined if I haven't been enrolled in the past?

No. Even if you have not enrolled before, you can do so now and you will not be fined. The AEC encourages all eligible Australians to enrol to vote and keep their details up-to-date on the electoral roll.

I'm a senior citizen, do I have to enrol?

Yes, you are required by law to enrol and vote in federal elections and referendums.

If you find it difficult to get to a polling place on election day, you can apply to become a General Postal Voter to receive your ballot papers in the mail. The AEC provides mobile polling to some nursing homes and hospitals, and assistance and disabled access at polling places.

If you’re a relative of a person with dementia who is on the electoral roll you can request they be removed from the electoral roll.

You will need to complete a form to remove their name from the electoral roll. The medical certificate on the form must be completed and signed by a registered medical practitioner.

Once the form is completed please return it to the AEC.

I have a disability, do I have to enrol?

Yes, you are required by law to enrol and vote in federal elections and referendums.

If you find it difficult to get to a polling place on election day, you can apply to become a General Postal Voter to receive your ballot papers in the mail. The AEC provides mobile polling to some hospitals, and assistance and disabled access is available at polling places.

If you have a physical disability that prevents you from writing, you can get someone else to complete and sign an enrolment form for persons unable to sign their name on your behalf.

If you’re a relative of a person with dementia who is on the electoral roll you can request they be removed from the electoral roll.

You will need to complete a form to remove their name from the electoral roll. The medical certificate on the form must be completed and signed by a registered medical practitioner.

Once the form is completed please return it to the AEC.

Who has access to my information?

The AEC is authorised under the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 to collect your details to maintain the electoral roll. To help ensure an open and accountable electoral process, the electoral roll (containing names and addresses) is available for public inspection at any AEC office. The publicly available roll does not contain your date of birth or contact details such as phone number or email address.

The AEC may disclose your details to prescribed authorities with access to enrolment information including:

  • state and territory electoral authorities
  • members of parliament, senators, registered political parties, and candidates for the House of Representatives
  • approved medical research and public health screening programs
  • any agencies, persons or organisations prescribed in the Electoral and Referendum Regulations 1940.

If you believe having your address shown on the electoral roll puts you or your family at risk, you can apply to register as a silent elector.